Staff Intro – Senior Lecturer Carol Smith

Main Research Areas: Paleoclimate. Land-reclamation. Pedology.

Carol is originally from the UK, growing up in South-East England, before moving to New Zealand in 1993. She completed a BSc. (Hons) in geographical science at Portsmouth, followed by a MSc in pedology and soil survey at Reading and then a PhD in soil science at Aberdeen.

Paleoclimate – a climate prevalent at a particular time in the geological past.

Pedology – the study of soils in their natural environment. The scientific study of soils and their weathering profiles.

It was her undergraduate focus on geomorphology, pedology, combined with micro-morphology while at Reading, that got her into the area of research she follows today. “The paleoclimate record in soils and landscapes is relevant to our understanding of the extent of past climate change; it offers a point of reference to computer models of future climate”. Carol is also passionate about land rehabilitation and the opportunities that using recycled organic materials can have on improving soil quality.

“Looking at New Zealand’s past climate through soils is very exciting.”

Carol Smith at Soil Judging Comp 2016

Carol started at Lincoln University as a tutor alongside the legendary Phil Tokin in 1993. Following a move to Sydney in 1997 with her young family and a stint in the private sector as an environmental consultant, she returned to Lincoln in 2005 as a lecturer in soil science. She was appointed to her present role as HoD in 2017. Carol’s inspiration in this role is being able to work with people and help them do their job to the best of their ability; whether that is through teaching, research or university management.

“It’s all about the people – the staff and students in the Soil Department; we all work together as a good team. We are small enough to know each other and we also have a few adventures along the way.”

In her down time Carol makes the most of the outdoors, seeking a balance between a busy work week and active relaxation on the weekends, when she can be found hitting the Port Hills on her bike. Skiing and tramping are also favourites when the seasons allow, as well as catching up with her two young adult children (when they’re not asking for money or to borrow the car). “Exploring NZ, all those hidden, beautiful corners.”

Find out more: Carol Smith Lincoln University Staff Profile

Carol Smith Blog Photo_B&W

PhD Postgrad Intro – Monica Giona Bucci

Monica Giona Bucci has just completed her PhD in the department of Soil Science at Lincoln University. Professor Peter Almond (Lincoln University), Dr. Pilar Villamor (GNS Science), Dr. Martitia Tuttle  (Tuttle & Associates) and Dr. Carol Smith (Lincoln University) have supervised her research.

I come from Italy where I completed a Bachelor and Master degree in Earth and Environmental Sciences at “La Sapienza” University of Rome. During both my final dissertations I learnt the importance of studying pedology and GIS mapping and these skills were particularly useful during my PhD.

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My PhD project was about studying the sedimentary architecture of two settings (alluvial and coastal) affected by liquefaction features triggered during the 2010-2011 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence. My PhD research was very interesting because it allowed me to learn different techniques for liquefaction investigations and to contribute in improving the understanding of the susceptibility to liquefaction across the Canterbury Region.

Staff Intro – Professor Leo Condron

Main Research Areas: Phosphorus. Micro-organisms. Chronosequences.

Leo grew up in Glasgow, Scotland. After completing a Bachelor of Science with Honours at the University of Glasgow he moved to New Zealand to further his education at Lincoln University. 1980 – 1984, PhD in Soil Science at Lincoln. Reaching for the highest possible qualification, Leo also completed a Doctor of Science in Soil Science at Canterbury. Returning to Lincoln in 1989 he’s never left, and is now a Professor of Biogeochemistry; 50% research (including PG supervision), 30% teaching, 20% admin.

Why soil science? “My father was a farmer, I always had an interest in Agriculture and while doing my degree I developed a greater interest in soil science.” Working at Lincoln University has allowed for Leo to focus on one area of research for more than 30 years, meaning that he has been able to continue to develop it. ‘It’ being phosphorus, or a combination of all his passions; phosphorus, micro-organisms and chronosquences where possible. This is what keeps him going, having never lost interest in it or agriculture.

Continuity is Leo’s favourite thing about the Soil’s Department at Lincoln. The Lincoln University Soil Science Department has been able to sustain the continuity of research even though there has been a lot of changes, allowing for a coherent department that is great to work in. Maintaining this number of Soil Scientists together has been really lucky, “There is no other group of soil scientists this big in the world that I know of.

Outside of University Leo’s time is taken up being a father to three kids and some tropical fish. Also enjoying music, Cuban cigars and a good bottle of Bourbon whiskey.

Find out More: Professor Leo Condron Lincoln University Staff Profile

Leo Condron Blog Photo_B&W

D.Sc. University of Canterbury, New Zealand. 2016.

Biogeochemistry of Phosphorus in Soil-Plant Systems
Ph.D. Soil Science. Lincoln College (University of Canterbury), New Zealand. 1986.
‘Chemical nature and plant availability of phosphorus present in soils under long-term fertilised irrigated pastures in Canterbury, New Zealand’
B.Sc. Honours (II i). Agricultural Chemistry. University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK. 1980.
Research Profile:  Biogeochemistry of organic carbon and major nutrients in natural and managed ecosystems, with an emphasis on the nature, dynamics and bioavailability of organic and mineral forms of nutrients in the soil-plant system in relation to soil management and land use.  Project areas include organic matter and nutrient dynamics in grassland and forest soils, soil chronosequence dynamics, rhizosphere processes and nutrient acquisition, relationships between soil microbial diversity and function, and the nature, and the bioavailability and mobility of phosphorus in terrestrial environments.

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Staff Intro – Professor Timothy Clough

Professor Timothy Clough.

Main Research Areas: Green House Gases (GHG), Nitrogen (N) and Carbon (C).

Lincoln University has been lucky enough to have Tim here for 20 years! Tim’s enthusiasm for research and teaching in soil science hasn’t waned, saying “there’s no ground hog days, it’s always different, there’s variety and it’s very interesting. The discovery of new findings keeps me going.”

Tim is a Christchurch man, born and breed in Canterbury. After working on a Sheep station one summer he was inspired to go to Lincoln University, where he pursed a degree in Agricultural Science. Completing a BAgSc with Honours he went to work at MAF in Hamilton, before returning to Lincoln for a PhD in Soil Science. Tim’s PhD research looked at “Bovine Urine N in Peat Soils”, this lead onto nitrous oxide and where he is today, specialising in GHGs.

Tim’s role at Lincoln University includes scientific research, teaching and postgraduate supervision. The things that stand out for Tim about working in Lincoln University Soil Science Department are; the open door policy, collegiality and the expertise within the department. “We’re world leading in some of the work we do. When I came to Lincoln, you’d heard of the guys who worked here, they were well known for what they were achieving on the world stage.”

‘Collegial – an adjective describing a work environment where responsibility and authority is shared equally by colleagues. You know you work in a collegial environment when your co-workers smile at you, and you don’t have to hide from your supervisor.’

When he’s not hard at work at Lincoln University unearthing new scientific discoveries, teaching young minds and supervising postgrads, Tim enjoys the outdoors. Spending his down time; tramping, fishing, swimming and biking, also enjoying his music, having played saxophone. Who knows how he fits it all in!

Find out more – Professor Timothy Clough Lincoln University Staff Profile

TImothy Clough - Blog Photo

Staff Intro – Associate Professor Jim Moir

Associate Professor Jim Moir.

Main Research Areas: Soil Fertility & Plant Growth Relationships. Fertilisers.

Growing up on a Dairy farm in Taranaki, Jim had an eye for agriculture from a young age. While at Massey University working in detail with soil chemistry and plant growth relationships, Jim was inspired to follow the path of research he specialises in today. Completing a Bachelor of Agriculture along with a Post-grad diploma, Masters and PhD in Soil Science before coming to Lincoln University.

17 years at Lincoln University, now an Associate Professor in the Agriculture and Life Sciences, Soil Science Department. Jim is a senior researcher, postgraduate supervisor and undergraduate lecturer. As well as his on campus research and teaching, Jim spends time working on national and international projects and extension – both on and off farm science communication and research.

Investigating the unknown and making new discoveries is what keeps Jim inspired in his work. His favourite thing about the Lincoln University Soil Science Department is being able to collaborate and work with such great people; valued colleagues and students. Outside of University Jim is an avid traveler, book reader and socialite, enjoying catching up with friends for a cold one.

Jim Moir - Blog Photo

PhD Postgrad Intro – Daniel Hendrie

Daniel Hendrie – Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Soil Science

 

Daniel Martin-Hendrie is currently studying for his PhD in the field of Soil Science at Lincoln University. Associate Professor Jim Moir, Dr. Alistar Black, Derrick Moot, Leo Condron and Dr. Nik Lehto are supervising this research.

“I am from South Canterbury and came to Lincoln way back in 2011. Having completed a BAgSci with honours I am now studying a PhD investigating lime and fertiliser application on legume production in acidic high country soils. My project is funded by the Fertiliser Association of New Zealand and Callaghan Innovation.”

PhD Postgrad Intro – Amy Whitley

Amy Whitley – Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Soil Science

 

Amy Whitley is currently studying for her PhD in the field of Soil Science at Lincoln University. Associate Professor Jim Moir, Peter Almond, Derrick Moot and Dr Niklas Lehto are supervising this research.

“I am from Hamilton and came down to the South Island to study a BSc majoring in Environmental Biogeosciences at Lincoln University in 2010. Having not come from a farming background, I quickly learnt the importance of soil in agricultural systems. I had some passionate lecturers who made me excited about soils and I wanted to learn more. I decided to complete an honours year of research, which looked at the response of six forage legume species to lime, phosphorus and sulphur on an acidic high country soil”

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“My PhD thesis research focus is on soil acidity and Al toxicity on high and hill country soils in New Zealand. This has led me on many exciting adventures around New Zealand, to some picturesque places to sample soils.  I am looking forward to seeing where this will take me in the future.”